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Fishing in Ireland 

The River Bann is the second longest river in Ireland. It rises in the Mourne mountains, flows into and then out of Lough Neagh, which is the largest freshwater lake in the Europe. The Lower Bann drains this and the northern half of Northern Ireland.

You can enjoy coarse fishing all year round in Northern Ireland which has long been recognized as one of Europe's best regions for the coarse angler. Two particularly notable venues for big matches are Lough Erne in Fermanagh and the Upper Bann river which flows into the vast inland sea of Lough Neagh. Both have held innumerable match fishing world records.

Here you can see me match fishing on the river Bann, Portadown.The match was five hour's and I weigh in 135lb of roach which won  the contest. All nets on the day were over 80lb. So you can see the  potential of the river, any one that as not fish for roach in N.Ireland as miss a lot.

 
 
 
Below : The Catch in N.Ireland .
Above : Pole fishing the river Bann Portadown N.Ireland
The cach on the river Bann
Above Fishing at home in Stratford on Avon.
 
Diving is for all
 
In the shrinking world, fast jet planes carry passengers to the remote corners of the earth in a matter of hours. Few secrets remain, few places are untried by human foot, and only the highest mountains, the dense equatorial forests or remote deserts offer challenge to the land-bound exploring spirit. Yet for the trained sport diver adventure and exploration lie metres from any beach anywhere. For here starts the vast expanse that accounts for seven tenths of the surface of the earth. Beyond the holiday-makers on the beach, a diver will find silence, peace, adventure and, during a brief sojourn, see some part of the earth's surface no other human has seen before. Not necessarily for a diver the costly expedition to faraway places: a few short hours after leaving desk or workbench he or she can be an explorer in the wonderful world that lies just below the surface of the sea.
 
History of Sport Diving
 
 

Diving has been practiced in a variety of forms for centuries.  Brave men using cumbersome and often extremely dangerous equipment have worked on shipwrecks, wrested treasure from the depths and performed extraordinary feats of civil engineering beneath the surface.

The unpleasant and risky nature of this work, coupled with restrictions of movement and vision imposed by the equipment, would have excluded any pleasure from the experience. The diver, tethered to the surface by his lifelines and air-supply hose, would have little time or enthusiasm for anything but the job in hand, his personal safety and his hopefully imminent return to the surface. 

The unpleasant and risky nature of this work, coupled with restrictions of movement and vision imposed by the equipment, would have excluded any pleasure from the experience. The diver, tethered to the surface by his lifelines and air-supply hose, would have little time or enthusiasm for anything but the job in hand, his personal safety and his hopefully imminent return to the surface. Nor was there much pleasure for the wartime "frogmen" or human torpedoes- known as "charioteers"- who, despite comparative freedom of movement afforded by portable oxygen sets and frogman's fins, were subject to depth limits because they were breathing undiluted oxygen.  In addition the discomfort of clammy so-called "dry" suits, to say nothing of the highly dangerous tasks they undertook, would distract the most romantic soul from the beauty which may have, at times, surrounded them. Despite their wartime experiences - clamping magnetic mines to the underside of enemy ships. cutting through anti- submarine nets or sitting astride as much as 500lb of high explosive contained within the human torpedo they steered, many of these ex-service divers, appreciating the potential of diving for sport, provided the hard core of early sport diving clubs.

 
 

Did not find the gold but still looking.

Above : Diving In South Cornwall.

Cornwall and good diving are synonymous. Its long coastline, bounded on three sides by the sea, together with its climate, clear water, abundance of shipwrecks and variety of underwater scenery and conditions, these offer sport diving as good, if not better, than any county in the British Isles.

 
 
Diving in tropical seas
Dangerous Tropical Marine Animals
 
 
Left : The barracuda, it is usually seen in groups of up to several hundreds. A speared fish or a bleeding diver might attract a barracuda. They strike at shiny objects, so do not draw your knife casually.
 
 
Left : Everyone's favourite nasty sea creature is the shark. However, most species of shark are extremely unlikely to attack a diver, although all should be treated with respect. The occasional shark encountered on a dive will usually ignore a diver on the bottom, but may take more interest in a snorkeller or swimmer splashing on the surface or a diver returning to the surface. A shark which becomes interested may circle before approaching and would normally bump a potential victim, as this is the way in which they 'taste' if the object is edible. A violent punch on the nose or eyes of an attacking shark may dissuade it from pressing further attacks. However, avoidance is the most sensible precaution.
 
 
Left : The Moray eel are residents of most reefs and are usually docile. However, they should not be provoked, they can strike very much faster than a diver can react and they have very sharp and powerful jaws.
 
 
 
Above the Stingray.
There are several types of fish with very painful, and sometimes deadly, stings. The lionfish displays long, feathery fins in brilliant colours it should not be approached closely or touched as a number of the dorsal fins contain venom.
 
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